Category Archives: Change

Lobbying in the US – The Basics

Lobbying in the US is very different from lobbying in Australia, and US grassroots lobbying is different again, but these three articles make some good points about the basics of lobbying everywhere:

If you want to know more about lobbying in the US you could do worse than check out the blog on these pages: http://www.lobbyists.info/, and if you want to know how bad and dark corporate lobbying can get in the US, get hold of this documentary and watch it several times – you’ll have trouble believing what you are seeing: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casino_Jack_and_the_United_States_of_Money … Mike Smith has a copy he might loan.

But, if you actually want to know how to lobby in the US, you can’t go past this book as a sound, thorough and well-rounded primer  http://www.amazon.com/Influence-Game-Insider-Washington-Lobbying/dp/1118271599/.

One major similarity between Australia and the US: each State and National jurisdiction has a different set of rules relating to lobbying registration, gift-giving and interaction with Government.

 

 

 

How to Lobby – Updated

A great resource if you want something from Government – our updated* directory of How To Lobby articles**, published since 2013, indexed by topics, and entirely free!

Click one of these links to take you to that topic/heading:

      1. Why
      2. Who Does It?
      3. Reality Bites
      4. Strategy
      5. The Basics
      6. Targeting
      7. Policy Processes – What You MUST Know
      8. Getting Ready
      9. The Meeting
      10. What To Ask For
      11. How To Ask For It
      12. When To Ask
      13. Specialties

Why

Why Lobby? http://wp.me/p4xOhB-r

“Why Lobby?” Encore http://wp.me/p4xOhB-A

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Who Does It

Who’s a Lobbyist? http://wp.me/p4xOhB-N

Who’s Your Best Lobbyist? http://wp.me/p4xOhB-23

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Reality Bites

Lobbying: The Dirty Truth https://ethicalconsultingservices.wordpress.com/2014/08/12/lobbying-the-dirty-truth/

Myths & Legends of Lobbying https://ethicalconsultingservices.wordpress.com/2014/10/16/myths-lobbying/

Dogbert Does Lobbying
Regulating Lobbyists: Hardly https://ethicalconsultingservices.wordpress.com/2014/10/22/regulating-lobbyists-hardly/

Australian Lobbying: Credibility Fail https://ethicalconsultingservices.wordpress.com/2015/03/10/australian-lobbying-credibility-fail/

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Strategy

Don’t Just Do Something, Sit There! https://ethicalconsultingservices.wordpress.com/2014/09/17/dont-just-do-something/

Strategy & Delusion https://ethicalconsultingservices.wordpress.com/2014/08/12/strategy-delusion/

DON’T Increase Awareness https://ethicalconsultingservices.wordpress.com/2014/08/26/dont-increase-awareness/

When to “go political” or be partisan https://ethicalconsultingservices.wordpress.com/2017/07/31/lobbying-when-political/

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burke-grillThe Basics

Lobbying: 6 Things to Know https://ethicalconsultingservices.wordpress.com/2014/09/24/6-lobbying-things/

Lobbyists Do WHAT? https://ethicalconsultingservices.wordpress.com/2015/03/03/lobbyists-do-what/

Lobbying is Marketing https://ethicalconsultingservices.wordpress.com/2015/04/01/lobbying-is-marketing/

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Targeting

“Get Me The Premier!” https://ethicalconsultingservices.wordpress.com/2014/11/12/get-me-the-premier/

Who’s the Decision-Maker? https://ethicalconsultingservices.wordpress.com/2014/10/02/who-decision-maker/

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Policy Processes – What You MUST Know

Mysterious & Mysteriouser: How Did THAT Happen?  https://ethicalconsultingservices.wordpress.com/2014/12/18/mysterious-mysteriouser/

“So When WILL They Decide???” https://ethicalconsultingservices.wordpress.com/2014/12/10/when-will-they-decide/

From Althaus, Bridgman and Davis

From Althaus, Bridgman and Davis

How’s Your Rat King? https://ethicalconsultingservices.wordpress.com/2014/11/27/rat-king/

The Uber-Rat-King https://ethicalconsultingservices.wordpress.com/2014/12/04/the-uber-rat-king/

What IS A “Policy Instrument,” Anyway? https://ethicalconsultingservices.wordpress.com/2015/01/22/what-is-policy-instrument/

Sax vs. Cymbals https://ethicalconsultingservices.wordpress.com/2015/01/28/sax-vs-cymbals/

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Getting Ready To Lobby

Lobbying Labor’s Queensland Government: How? https://ethicalconsultingservices.wordpress.com/2015/02/17/lobbying-labors-queensland-government-how/

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The Meeting

How to Get That Meeting https://ethicalconsultingservices.wordpress.com/2015/05/06/how-to-get-that-meeting/

What if You Can’t Connect with the Decision-Maker? https://ethicalconsultingservices.wordpress.com/2015/07/28/cant-reach-decision-makers/

When you meet the Minister … https://ethicalconsultingservices.wordpress.com/2015/03/18/when-you-meet-the-minister/

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What To Ask For

Persuading Government: What You Say  https://ethicalconsultingservices.wordpress.com/2015/05/13/persuading-government-what-you-say/

What Makes A Policy Good? https://ethicalconsultingservices.wordpress.com/2015/05/28/policy-good/

Make Your “Ask” Feasible https://ethicalconsultingservices.wordpress.com/2015/07/01/make-your-ask-feasible/

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agressive-manHow To Ask For It

Connecting with Decision-Makers https://ethicalconsultingservices.wordpress.com/2014/11/11/connect-decision-makers/

Tell Government a Story!  https://ethicalconsultingservices.wordpress.com/2015/07/22/story-to-government/

Motivating & Persuading https://ethicalconsultingservices.wordpress.com/2014/10/09/motivating-persuading/

Persuading Government: How To Say It  https://ethicalconsultingservices.wordpress.com/2015/05/20/persuading-government-how-to-say-it/

The Talking Dead: Say This & Your Project Dies  https://ethicalconsultingservices.wordpress.com/2015/06/18/the-talking-dead/

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When To Ask

Election Time: Early Birds Get Worms!  https://ethicalconsultingservices.wordpress.com/2015/08/04/elections-lobbying-early-birds/

What it means when Government is in “caretaker mode” https://ethicalconsultingservices.wordpress.com/2017/11/02/qld-govt-caretaker-2017/

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Specialties

Crisis Management 101 https://ethicalconsultingservices.wordpress.com/2015/01/13/crisis-management-101/

And now, over to you:

What other topics would you like to see covered?  What have you struggled with in the past, when looking for decisions from Government?

 

* With more content than previous versions!
** There will be more!
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Queensland Government is in “Caretaker Mode”

Now the State election has been called – see https://ethicalconsultingservices.wordpress.com/2017/10/29/queensland-state-election-basics/ – the Government moves into what is called “Caretaker Mode”.

Caretaker Mode is all about both maintaining public sector impartiality, and ensuring no decisions or commitments are made which will bind a new, possibly unwilling Government, post-election.

Many public servants interpret this incredibly widely – far more so than is intended or appropriate, and this can be a real nuisance for anyone trying to do business with the State Government.

Official guidelines for the conventions which apply during the caretaker period are set out in the Cabinet Handbook, section 9, here https://www.premiers.qld.gov.au/publications/categories/policies-and-codes/handbooks/cabinet-handbook/caretaker-conventions.aspx.

In summary:

  • Caretaker conventions are merely conventions and not binding at law – but are nearly always adhered to;
  • Caretaker period starts the moment the election is called and lasts until either te result is clear or a new Government appointed;
  • Things to avoid during the caretaker period: appointments of significance, implementing new policies, entering into major contracts or undertakings;
  • Normal Departmental operations are to continue, but with care to ensure there’s no presumption about who will win the election;
  • Departments should not at Ministerial request develop new policy initiatives;
  • Opposition access to public servants is through requests to the Minister and any such discussions are confidential, but public servants may not discuss the merits of policy options with the Opposition and should keep no official notes;
  • Departments prepare two sets of briefing documents for the incoming Government: one for a returned Government, and the other for a new Government;
  • All Cabinet documents are readied for destruction;
  • All Bills in Parliament lapse and must start again from scratch after the election, and any Acts not yet proclaimed by the Governor must await the intentions of the incoming Government.  In some circumstances subordinate legislation may be approved;
  • The Premier will determine whether Government advertising campaigns continue – anything highlighting the role of Ministers or covering matters of political controversy are usually stopped;
  • Ministers generally don’t go to Council of Australian Governments meetings which occur during the caretaker period.

In detail:

Here’s a downloadable PDF file for your reading pleasure, courtesy of Ethical Consulting Services! http://bit.ly/2hnbr4p

 

 

 

Why Conduct a Training Needs Analysis?

We recently proposed a quick survey of new Board members, before constructing a training session for the new, probably quite inexperienced Board.  The client wanted to know why we should bother, and it forced us to think about it.  This article is OK www.trainsmartinc.com/why-conduct-a-training-needs-assessment/ but isn’t concise enough for some discussions, so we put together this list.

You should always conduct a training needs analysis because:

  1. Writing it down helps make sure everyone is talking about the same thing, when they are talking about training content and what’s needed;
  2. It helps measure the skills gap, rather than making a brave presumption or estimate of it;
  3. You might find a greater depth of knowledge than expected on some topics, and thus you can skip some things and focus on others, which means your training session is more focused and more valuable;
  4. You might discover a lower level of knowledge than expected on some topics, so the training needs to be recalibrated to a lower level of skill/knowledge;
  5. You might discover some of your participants have sufficient depth of skill in some areas to be able to mentor others, or assist in training;
  6. You might discover some participants have special needs, or discover unexpected diversity or uniformity amongst participants, or an age or gender profile which suggests particular training methods;
  7. It earns buy-in from participants if you’re asking for their input;
  8. If participants understand the training reflects their needs as well as the needs of the organisation, they are more likely to participate properly and come back for more;
  9. It makes it more likely participants will see they are getting the training they want and need, rather than only in areas decided by others;
  10. It gets participants ready for the training session and makes them think about what they want to get out of it;
  11. It alerts participants to the fact that there’s change afoot – the training is going to move participants away from their business as usual behaviour;
  12. It makes it much easier to determine the desired outcomes of training if you understand the underlying skills base, the skills gap, and what it is that participants expect and want;
  13. It makes it easier to determine how much training is needed – half a day, two days, three weeks, somewhere in between; and
  14. Training is expensive – trainer fees, and the time participants spend in training, both need to be spent on filling the gap between skills held and skills wanted – and you can’t be sure you’re spending well unless you’ve made an effort to measure that gap.

Not all of those reasons will apply to every organisation, of course!

With such free/inexpensive tools as SurveyMonkey.com, it can be quick and painless to get good information.

 

 

 

 

US Elections – 3 Phases, Now

hill-and-donThe future of this US Election cycle divides neatly into three phases:

  • between now and the close of polls;
  • from election night to the new President’s inauguration on 20 January 2017; and
  • after inauguration.

Phase 1 – up to close of polls

The next seven days will see a recently-better-controlled and more-focussed Donald Trump try to build on his gains of the last two weeks: victory is probably beyond his reach, but he’s now about saving the Republican Party from electoral devastation.

We’ll see Republicans actively campaign to suppress Democrat votes, and intimidate Democrats at polling places.

Will Hillary’s current lead, and voter revulsion at Trump, translate into effective Democrat control of Congress?

In the last two weeks, Hillary has slipped back in the polls by about 3%** nationally and if this trend continues through the week it will be a much tighter election (see http://fivethirtyeight.com/features/on-a-scale-of-1-to-10-how-much-should-democrats-panic/) and a much-reduced chance of coat-tails for the Democrats.

Phase 2 – election night to inauguration

A lot can happen between the TV networks*** declaring a winner on election night, and the Inauguration on 20 January 2017.  In 1861, most of the Confederacy announced their secession between Abraham Lincoln’s victory and his inauguration*, for example.

The victor’s speech matters – it sets the tone for their transition – as does the speech of the vanquished.  Will Hillary lay out a plan to heal the divisions made strikingly evident by this campaign?  Will Trump try to mobilise his supporters to defy US democracy and challenge Hillary’s legitimacy?

Will the new President have a supportive Congress to speed up and smooth their appointment of senior staff and transition to leadership?

Phase 3 – after inauguration

After they are inaugurated on 20 January 2017, the new President at last will begin the absurdly slow and complicated process of appointing senior Government officials.

Will ongoing challenges to the legitimacy of the new President undermine their capacity to govern and to lead?  Can the kind of illegitimate claims of “rigging” made by Trump be sustained beyond the short term?

Will the Republican Party’s grown-ups, so lacking in presence and responsibility for well over a decade, decide to take their Party leadership back from those who facilitated Trump, or do they lack the integrity?  If Trump wins, he’ll remake the Republican Party, and seek to remake the US, in his own image: there will be no room for more moderate voices, and the world will struggle to know how to respond.

 

* In March – these days it’s in January.

** as at 2 November 2016

*** Yes, on election night the TV networks call the shots.  The result isn’t formally declared until the Electoral College reports to Congress and Congress votes on their report at 1.00 pm on 6 January 2017.

 

Ethical Consulting Services’ Mike Smith is embedded in the US Presidential Elections until Election Day.

 

 

US Elections – New Every 4 Years

hill-and-donThey completely dissolve and re-form their Presidential campaigns every four years in the US, while in Australia the campaign machinery and personnel continue from one election cycle to another* – this is one of the big differences between Australian and US Election Campaigns.

This system in the US arises in large part because the Presidential campaign is so much a construct of the candidate, rather than the Party – based around the style and wishes of each individual candidate.

The downside of this system is the need to rebuild completely, and the capacity of a campaign to have to relearn hard lessons learned by previous campaigns.  I’ve seen that happen – one candidate’s campaign, four years after some inspired organising, had quite forgotten how to manage a particular and important aspect of campaigning.

Another downside is that campaigns have to re-learn the local terrain and quirks, and consultants have to be re-inducted all over again.

And it also builds a resentment amongst locals, that the Presidential campaign has come in over the top of them, and taken over their turf, again, without seeming interested in local knowledge, or employing locals.

There are two big upsides, though:

  1. a complete rebuild every four years clears away the bad habits of the past, makes it easier to innovate, and reduces the desire to prosecute the battles of the last political war, and
  2. Presidential candidates get an opportunity to build the campaign which best reflects their values, strategies and interests – and consistency between campaign and candidate brand is very important!

So, the feel is very different from Australia, and it’s the same with both major Parties.

Better or worse than Australia?  Maybe, on this issue, it’s simply different.

 

(Half of the Ethical Consulting Services team – that would be Mike – will be embedded within the US Presidential campaign, from mid-October: this year, US election day is 8 November.)

 

* With, in Australia, some uptake of new technology and some staff turnover, of course.

 

 

 

US Elections – What’s Different?

hill-and-donThere are so many differences between US and Australian elections it’s hard to know when to stop listing them:

  • Whilst some Australian legislatures have four-year terms and some have terms fixed, most US elections happen on the first Tuesday after the first Monday, quadrennially (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Election_Day_%28United_States%29#History);
  • In Australian, it’s prohibited – without special permission – for National, State or local Government elections to happen on the same day; in the US they mostly happen on that same day;
  • National election voting rules – polling places, hours of opening, early voting, postal voting, and so on – are in the US managed by States and counties, while in Australia the Federal and State Governments manage their own, respectively, and States generally manage local government elections;
  • It’s changing, but in most cases US States (sometimes counties) independently manage voter lists/electoral rolls, while in Australia the State and Territories, by agreement, have the Federal Government manage theirs;
  • Enrolment to vote is optional in the US and mandatory in Australia;
  • Voting is optional in the US, and mandatory in Australia;
  • In most parts of the US, enrolment to vote is partisan – i.e. you identify yourself publicly on the voter roll as a Democrat, Republican, independent and so on, while political alignment is private in Australia – and that partisan enrolment is a significant component of their primary and caucus system of choosing candidates;
  • In Australia, we vote on a Saturday (still a day off work for most people) while in the US it’s Tuesday, a working day; and
  • Election campaigns in the US are not, as they are in Australia, the cooperative meshing of a party machine’s structures and a leader’s staff – US campaign organisations and structures (for big elections anyway) are mostly completely rebuilt from scratch every four years, at the individual candidate’s direction.

 

Several of these points have quite big implications, and we’ll post articles about these in the coming days.

 

 

(Half of the Ethical Consulting Services team – that would be Mike – will be embedded within the US Presidential campaign, from mid-October: this year, US election day is 8 November.)

 

 

 

US Elections – What’s Happening?

hill-and-donThis year, US Presidential election day is 8 November.

Half of the Ethical Consulting Services team – that would be Mike – is off, shortly, to embed within the US Presidential campaign, in Philadelphia.

This blog http://fivethirtyeight.com/politics/ is nearly always the best summary of where the competing Presidential stand in the polls.  It’s easy to pick which states are critical, by checking out their maps and the blog.

Other elections are going on, as well:

Mike is hoping to blog about his experiences while he’s away, but these campaigns are hard work and he’s not promising.

And, why Philadelphia?  Pennsylvania is usually a highly competitive state for the Presidential ballot, so campaigners get to see world-class campaigning (Mike was there in 2004 for John Kerry’s campaign, and 2008 and 2012 for the two Obama campaigns); plus, the polls are very tight in Pennsylvania right now, and Donald Trump has previously said he’ll target the State.

This also means our “Last Week in Queensland” weekly blogs and newsletters will be having a break, from 4 October to 21 November.

Northern Territory: New Gunner Labor Ministry

Michael Gunner, the new Chief Minister of the Northern Territory announced his first Cabinet of three, on 1 September, following Labor’s victory in the NT election held on 27 August 2016.

On 11 September 2016, today, he announced his second Cabinet; the new Ministers are listed below, with some short biographies*.

Had Lynne Walker been re-elected the Member for Nhulunbuy, she would have been Deputy Chief Minister, and the closeness of the vote in that election delayed finalisation of the full Ministry.

All other Labor MPs have been made Assistant Ministers, listed below, and the Government has decided to support the current Speaker, former CLP MLA Kezia Purick, continuing in that role.

The new Gunner Government has moved rapidly to terminate Chief Executives, amalgamate agencies, and implement other Machinery of Government changes: www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2016/sep/08/northern-territory-axes-ceos-and-amalgamates-departments-under-public-service-shake-up

The election for a Legislative Assembly of 25 saw the Country-Liberal Party government of Adam Giles reduced to 2 seats, Labor secure 18, and independents have 5.  Of the 25, twelve are women; 6 identify as being of aboriginal descent.  Of the Cabinet of 8, 5 are women – a majority; 1 identifies as being of aboriginal descent.

This is the greatest proportion of women in any legislature** of any Australian jurisdiction, ever, and the (equal) greatest proportion of indigenous members in any legislature** of any Australian jurisdiction, ever – matching part of the 2005 to 2008 term of the NT Legislative Assembly.

gunner_michael

Michael Gunner
Chief Minister and Minister for Police, Fire and Emergency Services, Aboriginal Affairs, Trade, Business and Innovation, and Northern Development
Member for Fannie Bay

Michael Gunner is a fourth generation Territorian whose family have lived and worked here since the 1930’s.  Born on 6 January 1976 in Alice Springs, he is the first Northern Territory-born Chief Minister.  He was educated in Alice Springs and Tennant Creek, and Darwin and Northern Territory University.  He has represented the Territory in Rugby Union and at various times has played cricket for PINTS, and soccer for the Verdi Club in Alice Springs.  Michael has previously worked stocking shelves at Woolworths, as a union organiser, an electorate officer, and a ministerial adviser.  He was first elected in August 2008 and became Labor Leader in April 2015.  Michael’s partner is Kristy O’Brien.
Nicole was born in 1979 in Tennant Creek and grew up in her Wanguri electorate. She attended local schools including Holy Spirit School, Dripstone Middle School and Casuarina Senior College before attending Curtin University in Perth and securing a Bachelor of Mass Communication. Nicole has been the Member for Wanguri since February 2013 when she won the seat in a by-election. Prior to entering Parliament, she worked for PowerWater and government departments in a range of Communications and Human Resource, as an adviser to several Ministers in the previous Labor Government, and in the private sector in Perth. Nicole plays and coaches for Waratah Netball Club, and lives in her electorate with her husband Scott Mc Neill, and son Aiden.
Nicole Manison
Deputy Chief Minister, Treasurer, Minister for Infrastructure, Planning, and Logistics, and Minister for Children
Member for Wanguri
fyles_natasha

Natasha Fyles
Attorney General and Minister for Justice, Minister for Health and the Leader of Government Business
Member for Nightcliff

Natasha was born at the old Darwin hospital on 26 May 1978, grew up in the Northern suburbs and lives with her husband Paul Archbold and sons Oliver and Henry in Nightcliff. She went to school in Darwin, and after completing her teaching degree at University of Canberra, returned to Darwin as a teacher for five years before travelling and working overseas. Natasha became Executive Director of Royal Life Saving Society NT and was active in the community including local swimming clubs, and Vice President of Nightcliff Family Childcare Centre. She also worked as an aquatic administration assistant for the 2000 Sydney Olympics, and as a public servant. She was first elected in 2012.
First elected in 2008, Gerry McCarthy is the only member of Cabinet with previous Ministerial experience: in the course or several reshuffles he had responsibility for Transport, Correctional Services, Arts and Museums, Senior Territorians, Young Territorians, Lands and Planning, and Construction. Gerry was born on 30 June 1958, and worked for 28 years, mostly as a teacher in remote schools, and in and around Borroloola and Tennant Creek. He played a key role in founding five Barkly schools and is active in many sporting, cultural and arts initiatives throughout the region. mccarthy_gerry

Gerry McCarthy
Minister for Housing and Community Development, Minister for Essential Services and Minister for Public Employment
Member for Barkly

vowles_ken

Ken Vowles
Minister for Primary Industry and Resources
Member for Johnston

Ken grew up as part of a huge Territory family, born on 29 September 1971 in Darwin. He attended pre-school and school in Jingili, and later won a scholarship to spend a year at the Australian Cricket Academy. He is a former Australian Under-17s and Under-19s cricketer and he played A grade cricket in Adelaide for many years. As an under 19 Ken scored the then fastest ever century at the MCG; he’s also represented the NT in numerous cricket competitions and has coached and played in Malaysia. Before entering parliament Vowles set up and ran a specialist cricket coaching centre in Darwin. He was one of three indigenous cricketers to take part in a Chief Ministers XI cricket match against a touring Bangladesh team at Marrara in July 2003. Ken has a wide range of experience working with disadvantaged people and communities across the Territory. His successful candidacy in 2012 was marred by controversy over his spent assault conviction from a fight in 1992.
Lauren was born in Crewe, United Kingdom, on 6 May 1987, and emigrated to Australia in 1999. She grew up in Nakara where her parents have taught in local schools, and Her Bachelor of Business was gained through Charles Darwin University and Monash University. Prior to entering politics, she ran a small business providing professional development and worked as a project officer at Headspace, providing mental health services support. Her community and youth development work have been recognised locally and nationally. She was honoured to receive the Excellence in Youth Leadership award at the NT Young Achiever Awards, the NT Pride of Australia Young Leader Medal. She was a finalist in the NT Young Australian of the Year, Darwin City Council Young Citizen of the Year and the Australian Woman’s Weekly Women of the Future. When elected to Parliament in 2014, she became the youngest ever Northern Territory Member of Parliament, and the second of Indian descent. Her partner is Jake Lutz. moss-lauren

Lauren Moss
Minister for Environment and Natural Resources, Minister for Tourism and Culture and Minister for Corporate Information Services
Member for Wanguri

Eva Lawler
Minister for Education
Member for Drysdale

Lawler was born and bred in Darwin: her family was evacuated after Cyclone Tracey but returned shortly afterwards, and she then started her secondary education at Darwin High School. She completed a Bachelor of Education at what was Darwin Community College. She started teaching at Berry Springs Primary School in the 1980’s, then worked at Gray Primary School, Humpty Doo Primary School, Anula Primary School and became Principal at Jingili Primary School. Lawler has also worked as a Health Educator within the Education Department promoting health and wellbeing in schools. While teaching she completed a Masters in Education and a Masters in International Management, a Diploma in Project Management and an Associate Diploma in Public Service Management. Lawler has worked in executive roles in Education in Alice Springs and as Deputy Chief Executive School Education for the whole of the Territory, and was Education Adviser to Paul Henderson and Marion Scrymgour. Until recently Lawler worked in the Department of Sport and Recreation where she was responsible for leading the delivery of high-level sporting events such as the Mitchell Street Mile, Davis Cup Tennis, NRL and Alice Springs Masters Games. She has represented the NT in hockey, including 3 years as Captain. Eva is married to Tom Lawler, a long-term Territory firefighter and has two adult children, daughter Kirby and son Lindsay.
Dale was born and raised in Melbourne, attending local public schools, then securing a social work degree after attending Latrobe and Monash Universities. She moved to Alice Springs in 2004 after working in road trauma rehabilitation for many years, and lives in Braitling with her partner Gary and son Jimmy. Dale has over 25 years’ experience in the health, disability, and domestic violence sectors, in both the private and public sectors. She has been a member of the Alice Springs Health Governing Council and was Chairwoman and Board member of Central Australian Women’s Legal Service. She has represented the NT on several national bodies. Over the last 8 years, she has led the Alice Springs Women’s Shelter to become a nationally recognised and award-winning service, and she was recognised in the 2015 Telstra Business Women Awards, with Dale named an NT finalist. Dale Wakefield

Dale Wakefield
Minister for Territory Families
Member for Braitling

Assistant Ministers
  • Ngaree Ah Kit is Assistant Minister for Suicide Prevention, Mental health and Disabilities, and the Assistant Minister for Seniors and Youth.
  • Jeff Collins is Assistant Minister for Police, Fire and Emergency Services, Assistant Minister for Primary Industry & Resources and will chair the Government’s small business round tables.
  • Lawrence Costa is Assistant Minister for Remote Health Delivery and Homelands.
  • Paul Kirby is Assistant Minister for our Buy Local strategy, for The Museum Master Plan and for A Vibrant Darwin CBD. Paul has also been elected Government Whip.
  • Scott McConnell is Assistant Minister for Remote Housing Delivery, Arts Trails and for Indigenous Tourism Participation.
  • Sandra Nelson is Assistant Minister for the Prevention of Family violence and Women’s Policy.
  • Tony Sievers is Assistant Minister for Veterans Affairs, Men’s Policy and Sports and Community Events.
  • Chansey Paech is Assistant Minister for Aboriginal Affairs and the Iconic Indigenous Art Gallery.  
  • Selena Uibo is Assistant Minister for Remote Education and Families as First Teachers, Aboriginal Affairs and Minister Assisting the Chief Minister on Statehood.
  • Kate Worden is Assistant Minister for Bringing Back the Arafura Games and Multicultural Affairs.

 

 

*    These biographies were sourced from the Northern Territory ALP website here, the ABC’s Antony Green’s NT election website here, Wikipedia, here, and personal knowledge.
** Technically it isn’t a Parliament.

 

Northern Territory: 3 Ministers Only in First Gunner Ministry

Michael Gunner, the new Chief Minister of the Northern Territory, announced his first Cabinet on Wednesday, following Labor’s victory in the NT election held on 27 August 2016.

Because counting continues and it’s not perfectly certain some potential Ministers will be elected, he’s done what Gough Whitlam did in 1972 and appointed a very small Ministry holding multiple portfolios: Gunner himself holds 41 portfolios, listed at the bottom of this article, in addition to Chief Minister, while the two others hold one portfolio each.

Here are the new Ministers, with some short biographies*.  The final results in the election for a Legislative Assembly of 25 are almost certain to see the Country-Liberal Party government of Adam Giles reduced to 2 seats, Labor secure 18, and independents with 5.  Of the 25, it is expected, once all seats are declared, twelve will be women; 6 will identify as being of aboriginal descent (the original article was in error, saying 7 indigenous Members would be elected – it will in fact be six, and the article has now been corrected – thanks to Ken Vowles for pointing out my error.)

This is the greatest proportion of women in any legislature** of any Australian jurisdiction, ever, and the greatest number and proportion of indigenous members in any legislature** of any Australian jurisdiction, ever.

Michael Gunner is also the first Northern Territory-born Chief Minister.

gunner_michael

Michael Gunner
Chief Minister and more***
Member for Fannie Bay

Michael Gunner is a fourth generation Territorian whose family have lived and worked here since the 1930’s.  Born on 6 January 1976 in Alice Springs, he is the first Northern Territory-born Chief Minister.  He was educated in Alice Springs and Tennant Creek, and Darwin and Northern Territory University.  He has represented the Territory in Rugby Union and at various times has played cricket for PINTS, and soccer for the Verdi Club in Alice Springs.  Michael has previously worked stocking shelves at Woolworths, as a union organiser, an electorate officer and a ministerial adviser.  He was first elected in August 2008, and became Labor Leader in April 2015.  Michael’s partner is Kristy O’Brien.
Natasha was born at the old Darwin hospital on 26 May 1978, grew up in the Northern suburbs and lives with her husband Paul Archbold and sons Oliver and Henry in Nightcliff.  She went to school in Darwin, and after completing her teaching degree at University of Canberra, returned to Darwin as a teacher for five years before travelling and working overseas.  Natasha became Executive Director of Royal Life Saving Society NT, and was active in the community including local swimming clubs, and Vice President of Nightcliff Family Childcare Centre.  She also worked as an aquatic administration assistant for the 2000 Sydney Olympics, and as a public servant.  She was first elected in 2012. fyles_natasha

Natasha Fyles
Attorney-General and Minister for Justice
Member for Nightcliff

Nicole Manison
Treasurer
Member for Wanguri

Nicole was born in 1979 in Tennant Creek, and grew up in her Wanguri electorate.  She attended local schools including Holy Spirit School, Dripstone Middle School and Casuarina Senior College before attending Curtin University in Perth and securing a Bachelor of Mass Communication.  Nicole has been the Member for Wanguri since February 2013 when she won the seat in a by-election.  Prior to entering Parliament, she worked for PowerWater and government departments in a range of Communications and Human Resource, as an adviser to several Ministers in the previous Labor Government, and in the private sector in Perth.  Nicole plays and coaches for Waratah Netball Club, and lives in her electorate with her husband Scott Mc Neill, and son Aiden.

 

 

*    These biographies were sourced from the Northern Territory ALP website here, the ABC’s Antony Green’s NT election website here, Wikipedia, here, and personal knowledge.
** Technically it isn’t a Parliament.
*** As well as Premier, until a new Cabinet is appointed in the next two weeks, Chief Min Michael Gunner also holds the portfolios of  Minister for Police, Fire and Emergency Services, Minister for Tourism, Minister for Northern and Central Australia , Minister for Economic Development and Major Projects, Minister for Indigenous Affairs, Minister for Correctional Services , Minister for Business, Minister for Racing, Gaming and Licensing, Minister for Asian Engagement and Trade, Minister for Employment and Training, Minister for Public Employment , Minister for Corporate and Information Services, Minister for Multicultural Affairs, Minister for Defence Industries, Minister for Senior Territorians, Minister for Lands and Planning , Minister for Mines and Energy, Minister for Children and Families, Minister for Health, Minister for Disability Services, Minister for Mental Health Services , Minister for Education, Minister for Transport, Minister for Infrastructure, Minister for Essential Services, Minister for Veterans Support , Minister for Primary Industry and Fisheries, Minister for Land Resource Management, Minister for the Environment, Minister for Arts and Museums, Minister for Sport and Recreation, Minister for Young Territorians, Minister for Local Government and Community Services, Minister for Housing, Minister for Parks and Wildlife, Minister for Men’s Policy, Minister for Women’s Policy, Minister for Statehood