Monthly Archives: August 2015

Lobbying & Integrity – Government Wants You!

Dogbert Does LobbyingThere’s a Queensland Parliamentary Committee asking for your views on lobbying in Queensland – the outcome might significantly improve transparency and integrity in Government decision-making.

An estimated 80% of lobbying is unregulated, unreported and secret, right now.  The recommendations before the committee would take the rules that currently apply only to lobbyists who are consultants, and impose them on all of the other lobbyists, too – forcing them to abide by a code of conduct and publicly report contact with Ministers, Ministerial staff, and senior public servants, for example.

But be quick, if you want to have a say.

Back in June, the Palaszczuk Government appointed Professor Peter Coaldrake to conduct a Strategic Review of the Functions of the Integrity Commissioner, included a review of lobbyist regulation: his Report was tabled in State Parliament on 16 July 2015

Parliament’s Finance and Administration Committee has resolved to review the report to consider the recommendations made and comment on other findings, and they are calling for submissions – the closing date Monday 21 September 2015.  The Committee may consider holding a public hearing on Wednesday 14 October 2015.

You can find out more, and download the Coaldrake Report, here.

 

 

Elections & Lobbying: Early Birds Get Worms

early_bird_smallTo be the cat that’s got the cream, remember that the early bird definitely gets the worm … when it comes to ensuring an election campaign embraces your policy proposal.

Many people looking for a decision from Government see election time as an opportunity. It can be, but only if you approach it in the right way.

It is true that at election time Governments, parties and candidates are all intent on compiling an attractive and differentiating package of policy and program proposals, and some of them welcome input from industry, community groups and individuals.

However, be warned: capable Governments, political parties and candidates start putting their election policies together a long way out from Election Day, and finalise them months out from Election Day. As a general rule, the bigger the policy announcement or the bigger the budget associated with a policy announcement, the earlier will work commence.

Most advocates looking to make use of election timing as an opportunity to press the case for their particular proposal leave it far, far too late.

What constitutes timeliness varies from jurisdiction to jurisdiction, and depends a lot on the tier of Government with which you are dealing; this makes it impossible to advise a general rule, but a year out from an anticipated Election Day is not necessarily too early to begin advocacy of your proposition.

If you leave your intervention too late, then you have created an additional burden for yourself: as well as proving the validity of your idea or proposal, you will also need to prove that it is of sufficient political or community (i.e. campaigning) importance that the candidate or Party should reopen their policy development processes, and consider incorporating your proposal.

cat_cream_smallAs an outsider to the process you might think that this is quick and easy, but depending on campaign resources and Party resources, and in particular the budgetary impact of your proposal, it can be a significant organisational or time burden to a candidate or a Party late in the campaign, to reopen their policy development processes.

The barriers to raising a new idea in the months immediately before Election Day are substantial.